The U.S.-Japan trade agreement was signed on October 7, 2019 by U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer and Japanese Ambassador to the United States Shinsuke Sugiyama. After ratification by the Japanese Parliament, the agreement entered into force on 1 January 2020. The U.S.-Japan Trade Agreement (USJTA) came into force on January 1, 2020. In that agreement, Japan committed to grant the United States significant market access by phasing in most tariffs, implementing significant tariff reductions or allowing a certain volume of imports at a lower price. Once the USJTA is fully implemented, nearly 90% of U.S. food and agricultural products imported into Japan will be duty-free or preferential tariff access. The full text of the agreement and fact sheets are available on the website of the U.S. Trade Representative (USTR).

This agreement provides for the limited application of safeguard measures allowing temporary increases in tariffs when imports exceed a predetermined triggering measure. Japan will have protective measures for beef, pork, whey, oranges and racehorses. The following tables contain up-to-date information on security control levels and trading volumes applicable for current and past Japanese exercises (JFY). The United States and Japan have concluded a trade agreement on market access for certain agricultural and industrial products, with plans to continue negotiations for an expanded free trade agreement. On October 17, 2019, the United States and Japan agreed on market access for certain agricultural and industrial products. Japan`s legislature approved the agreement on December 5, 2019. President 9974`s proclamation was issued on December 26, 2019, with the effective date of January 1, 2020. On 30 December 2019, the Communication of the Federal Register (84 FR 72187) on the implementation of the agreement was published. Appendix II of the agreement sets out the rules of origin for determining whether a gutwartin is eligible for preferential or “agreement-derived” tariff treatment. The product-specific provisions (Annex II of the agreement) set out the degree of change in the tariff classification to which non-original materials must be subject. The general note 36 is added to the HTSUS and contains the requirements of the agreement.

Links to the text of the U.S.-Japan trade agreement and related documents are listed below. UsmEF slides with the most important details of the agreement are available online. For any questions, please contact Erin Borror. The USTR has also published the full text of the agreement online, as well as these incidental letters of interest: products made entirely or manufactured in the United States will generally be eligible for preferential tariff treatment under the USJTA. Products using materials from other countries may also be considered depending on the type of product and the classification of the customs code. For many of these products, the standard rule is a change in the tariff classification at the chapter or double-digit level (for example. B, HS 10 cereal with SH 11 flour), which occurs in the United States. Products subject to different rules are described in Appendix 1 of the treaty text.

At the time of importation, Japanese law requires Japanese importers to submit a statement confirming the origin of the product. In some cases, U.S. exporters may provide additional information directly to Japan Customs, but the initial declaration must come from the importer.